John Swett Unified School District, “Our Children are Warriors”

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Cover of a past JSHS yearbook, indicating the school has already made the connection between Indian and Warrior.

On February 11, 2015, Sacred Sites Protection and Rights of Indigenous Tribes (SSPRIT), a Vallejo based organization, advocated in partnership with The Carquinez Coalition to Change the Mascot (CCCM) to remove the Indian mascot at John Swett High School located in Crockett, CA. After a unanimous vote, John Swett Unified School District (JSUSD) removed the nearly 90 year old mascot. On February 10, 2016, John Swett Unified School District replaced the Indian mascot with Warrior. Why has JSUSD, Board of Education decided to choose Warriors as a replacement after the removal of an Indian Mascot? Why is JSUSD subjecting young people to images, and ideas that promote, and support war, and violence in school?

As a United States Army Veteran (Desert Shield/Desert Storm), trained in methods of war, I am disappointed that an institution of education would promote violence in connection with their schools. Personally, I would never want my daughter or grandchildren to glorify the horrors of violence, mutilation, and death promoted by war through a school mascot (or by any other means for that matter). The root of the word Warrior is “War”. A Warrior is someone who is engaged in conflict carried on by force of arms. War is a state, or period of armed hostility. War is active military operations, and is a method, or principle of waging armed conflict. War is the soldier’s business, and involves being active in hostility, contention, and conflict. Weapons training, and tactical defense training are not to be taken lightly, as they are used for killing during war. Why then would JSUSD feel a mascot associated with violence is acceptable? Young people are especially vulnerable to the effects of exposure to violence. Young people are subjected to violence, and violent imagery in the home, the community, the media, and in schools. Whether the violence is real, based on real events, or fictional; the effects on youth include reduced sensitivity toward others, being more fearful, and behaving more aggressively. Some school districts across the United States have resolutions forbidding violent imagery in connection to their schools. Ironically, the JSUSD Board’s resolution forbidding violent imagery within the school district, recognizes the ways that violence negatively impa
cts youth; yet the school board contradicted their own resolution when electing warriors as a mascot.

JSUSD Board Member, Deborah Brandon has publicly defended the warrior mascot stating, “Our children are warriors. Anyone can be a warrior”. These statements were made by Deborah Brandon on more than one occasion during JSUSD board meetings in 2015. This is problematic because it goes against the districts resolution, and also contradicts the districts missions and beliefs. JSUSD Mission & Beliefs can be found on the district’s website, and states “John Swett Unified School District’s dedicated professionals work for the good of all students, focusing on promoting higher student image1achievement by motivating, and challenging every student to strive enthusiastically toward academic, and personal success. All Students can, and must experience success in their own learning.” “Professional staff must put forth high quality
effort, employ multiple teaching strategies, and work as a team to educate their students. Professional staff, and students are responsible for the quality of the educational experience, and all will be accountable for it. All people deserve to be treated with respect, and are expected to treat all others with respect. Partnerships among professional staff, students, parents, and community are most effective when positive attitudes are sought, encouraged, and shared”.

Replacing an Indian Mascot with Warrior is not an example of treating others with respect and is not an example of accountability; Warrior mascots are often associated or depicted as Native American. Depicting Warriors as the John Swett’s High School is synonymous with the legacy JSUSD has created with the former John Swett High School Indian mascot. John Swett High School yearbooks, student newsletters, school team sporting events, cheerleading, scoreboards, and uniforms have all promoted, and upheld this legacy. JSUSD yearbooks over the decades have included the term “Warrior” in relation to their Indian Mascot, and is documented online. For this reason alone, JSUSD should abandon Warriors as a mascot. Sacred Sites Protection and Rights of Indigenous Tribes will continue to advocate for the removal of Native American mascots/Institutionalized racism, and mascots that promote violence in schools.

For More Information please contact: Sacred Sites Protection Sites Protection and Rights of Indigenous Tribes at: sspandrit@gmail.com or visit our Facebook Page: Save Sacredsites. 

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Another JSHS yearbook cover.

Audio Recordings of JSUSD Board of Education meetings are available online. To listen to the February 10th meeting, click here.  The mascot issue starts at 2:03:10.

The next JSUSD meeting is on March 9, 2016 at 6:30pm. (Please refer to the above link for the districts office location) SSPRIT will be in attendance, addressing the Warrior mascot. The public is welcome to attend. SSPRIT will be providing a teach-out prior to the board meeting. For more information about the teach-out, please email: sspandrit@gmail.com or visit http://www.facebook.com/save.sacredsites.1

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Molly Batchelder and reflections on attending a highschool with an Indian Mascot

My name me playing indianis Molly Batchelder.  I am blessed to be a member of Sacred Sites Protection and Rights of Indigenous Tribes.  And over the past two years I have been involved in the mascot decolonization work at John Swett High School, my alma mater.

This was me, playing Indian, when I was in high school.  This was me, isolating the Native American experience as a 16 year old white girl:  with faux buckskin and face paint, and tomahawk, likely performing the gestures we’ve all learned from Saturday morning cartoons and from playing cowboys and Indians.  We all know these gestures.  And this behavior was reinforced as acceptable, not only by mass media and pop culture, but by my learning institution.  I was encouraged to actually BE an Indian.  While opposing teams held up banners at football games that read: “Kill the Indians”; “Scalp the Indians.”

After the John Swett Education board voted unanimously this past March to retire their Indian mascot, one former student messaged me and said, “Great, thanks to you no one will even remember that Indians existed.” To which I replied, “Do you think Native Americans are extinct?”

The lines of fact and fiction are so blurred because of these mascots. For so many people in this country, the Indian I played in high school has actually replaced real human beings.  Please, I ask you to think about the implications when the dominant culture gets to control the image of another culture.  And then teaches its children to use the horrors of forgotten genocide as common sports banter.

I am not an Indian. I am European American, with a whole history of stories of my own and lines of ancestors that have contributed to the person I am today.  I have a responsibility grow and develop my own image.  Indigenous peoples have a responsibility to do the same with theirs, however they choose.  And we all have a responsibility to see each other as human.

This is an exciting time.  We are all now part of a mass movement where we have a chance to recognize the truth about these mascots and bring in together a new era of education and awareness for our future generations.   Please, join us.

John Swett High School Mascot, Indians, Removed after 90 years

cropped-10984110_917315454956092_6113370555949546181_n.jpgAlumni from John Swett High School, Molly Batchelder initially reached out to Wounded Knee Deocampo, Elder Advisory for SSPRIT, wanting to decolonize her high school mascot; Indians. In late 2013, SSPRIT successfully consulted and advised in the removal of the Vallejo High School Mascot; Apaches. This removal inspired Molly to request assistance. AIM West and ACLU were contacted to assist, as they had provided support with the decolonization of the Vallejo High School Mascot.

All parties met and an initial meeting to discuss the removal of the JSHS Mascot took place. It was agreed that action needed to be taken and a meeting was scheduled with John Swett Unified School District (JSUSD) Superintendent; Rob Stockberger. Also in attendance during this meeting was JSHS Principal Jeff Brauning. It was recommended by the Superintendent that the Coalition do community outreach; the Coalitions outreach lasted one full year.

On Febrauray 11, 2015 the mascot went up for a vote at a school district meeting. Many people from the Crockett and Rodeo Communities made a show of support and spoke on behalf of removing the mascot, as did several people from the Indigenous Community. Three people who were in opposition spoke in support of keeping the mascot. One lady stated she was fourth generation alumni and wanted to keep the mascot because of “Family Tradition.”

Native American mascots perpetuate negative stereotypes of Native American people, and demean their native traditions and rituals. Over 115 professional organizations representing civil rights, educational, athletic, and scientific experts have published resolutions or policies that state the use of Native American names and/or symbols by non-native schools/sports teams is a harmful form of ethnic stereotyping that promotes misunderstanding and prejudice which contributes to other problems faced by Native Americans.

After a request to have ongoing educational support from SSPRIT, The John Swett Unified School District, Board of Education unanimously voted to remove the mascot. Board member, Jim Delgadillo stated the mascot needed to be removed in order to show “respect” for Native Americans and the Native American Community.